The Promise – and Pitfalls – of State-led Development in Resource-rich Countries: Resource Nationalism in Latin America and Beyond — Developing Economics

The eclipse of neoliberalism in 2000s coincided with the so-called commodity ‘super cycle’ that lasted between 2002 and 2012. In search of a new model, resource-rich states began to articulate resource nationalism as a development strategy. While ownership and control of minerals and hydrocarbons are intricately tied to claims of state sovereignty and exercise of […]

via The Promise – and Pitfalls – of State-led Development in Resource-rich Countries: Resource Nationalism in Latin America and Beyond — Developing Economics

One thought on “The Promise – and Pitfalls – of State-led Development in Resource-rich Countries: Resource Nationalism in Latin America and Beyond — Developing Economics

  1. When we think back to the positive and negative outcomes associated with the Pink Tide in Latin America, we have to avoid hindsight and accept that things could have turned out differently. Coups and attempted coups in the region remind us that local elites were never able to implement development policies in a secure environment. When one looks at the classic thinking of Eduardo Galeano one can appreciate that imperialist nations have been intimately involved in Latin America for centuries, and this means that we must be cautious about narratives that do not acknowledge the full impact (and specific details) of repeated external intervention. As Chile was one of the first countries to be affected by neoliberalism in the 1970s, we might all appreciate that neoliberalism has never been adequately eclipsed- it is always available to be rolled out in hybrid forms as suits the imperatives or desires of actors at various levels of governance. Moreover, what has sometimes happened to democracy in Latin America can happen to nation states in diverse regions of the world- populism no longer being a theory of what goes on in Argentina or Bolivia.

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