Modern Monetary Theory and inflation – Anwar Shaikh’s critique

9780199390632Last week I posted several times on Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), a set of ideas which seems to have plenty of support, or at least generates plenty of debate, judging by its presence on the internet.

MMT is an offshoot of post-Keynesianism. The policies which flow from its main theses suggest that a wise and benevolent state can ‘print’ money, within certain limits, to achieve full employment and moderate inflation.

Some MMTers also support an Employer of Last Resort (ELR) function for the state too. In other words, the state should provide a job at a set wage for all those who want one, so that full employment can be sustained even when economic growth slows or the economy goes into recession. The ELR policy was supported by Hyman Minsky whose ideas have also influenced MMT. He saw it as a more productive alternative to forms of welfare which pay people while they are inactive in terms of formal employment. Continue reading

Anwar Shaikh on Keynes and Classical economics (and much else)

A series of interesting short videos featuring Anwar Shaikh of the New School, an economist I greatly admire, where he discusses his influences and aspects of his life’s work.

His magnum opusCapitalism, was published last year, and I have written on parts of it several times on this blog.

For those who don’t want to go through them all, I can recommend as a taster video number nine (of eleven), ‘Keynes and Classical Economics’, where he discusses the links he makes between the ideas of Keynes on aggregate demand, and competition and profitability in the work of Marx and the Classical economists. To reach this, press play, then skip forward between videos using the player controls.

Anwar Shaikh’s Classical theory of wages and unemployment

9780199390632Anwar Shaikh is a Professor of economics at the New School for Social Research in New York. His ideas, in his own words, draw mainly but not exclusively on the ‘Classical tradition’ of Smith, Ricardo and Marx. Marx himself was a critic of classical political economy, so in some ways Marxist political economy could be considered as a separate school of thought.

In Shaikh’s 2016 magnum opus, Capitalism, he also draws on Keynes and Kalecki, two economists who greatly inspired the post-Keynesian school. For Shaikh, the Keynesian/Kaleckian emphasis on aggregate demand remains important, but so too does aggregate supply, which is emphasised in mainstream neo-classical economics. According to Shaikh, the classical tradition is not so much demand-side, or supply-side, but ‘profit-side’. The rate of profit is central to his work, and it affects both demand and supply in the capitalist economy.

In this post I want to outline Shaikh’s theory of wages and unemployment, which is covered in Chapter 14 of Capitalism. He covers a great deal of theoretical and empirical ground in the book, not least in this chapter, and it makes for stimulating reading. To avoid making this post too long, I will focus on Shaikh’s own particular theory, rather than spending much time comparing it to alternative theories, which Shaikh does in the book. Continue reading

A turbulent capitalist economy: the vision of Anwar Shaikh

I have posted before on Anwar Shaikh and his 2016 magnum opus, Capitalism, but here are some notes and videos for those who are interested, from the Institute for New Economic Thinking:

In a recent interview at the INET offices in New York, Anwar Shaikh provided a background to the work and his life in this quest. See here: A Turbulent Capitalist Economy: The vision of Anwar Shaikh

via A Turbulent Capitalist Economy: The vision of Anwar Shaikh — Radical Political Economy

Capital, profit and asset prices – a brief digression

9780199390632A nice description of the basis of financial profits under capitalism:

“In a capitalist economy, the prices of most assets are derived from the potential gains to be made from them. Thus, the price of land is based on the rent which it might afford, and as Ricardo long ago showed, this rent is itself based on the profit which might be made through the use of the land. Similarly, the price of equity is tied to the future profits of the issuing company. In this sense, assets such as these are the first derivatives of real capital, bets made by the buyer on its future outcomes. From this point of view, so-called “financial derivatives” are the second derivatives of capital. They are instruments whose value is based on the expected future price of some underlying asset or future outcome (such as the future price of some commodity or currency). These can take the form of insurance against undesired risk, or bets on future gains or losses. They can also be pyramided by making derivatives based on derivatives (ie., third and fourth derivatives of capital, and so on). The calculus of finance has many moments. The end result is an inverted pyramid, with real profits at its base and a rapidly widening volume of financial assets stacked upon it.”

Anwar Shaikh (2016), Capitalism – Competition, Conflict, Crises, Chapter 6, p.231

 

Is capitalism sustainable? Thoughts from Anwar Shaikh

Professor Anwar Shaikh, author of this year’s magisterial Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises, with some brief thoughts on the sustainability of capitalism. For him, its dominant forces, such as the drive for profit, need to be channeled through appropriate policy, and its destructive side effects somehow negated. The aim should be to benefit the many, moreso than in today’s often hugely unequal societies. This is something that I absolutely agree with and I remain hopeful for this kind of outcome, at least in the longer term.

Competition and growth under capitalism: does Marx trump Keynes?

9780199390632“Capital is a particular form of social wealth driven by the profit motive. With this incentive comes a corresponding drive for expansion, for the conversion of capital into more capital, of profit into more profit. Each individual capital operates under this imperative, colliding with others trying to do the same, sometimes succeeding, sometimes just surviving, and sometimes failing altogether. This is real competition, antagonistic by nature and turbulent in operation. It is as different form so-called perfect competition as war is from ballet.

…Real competition is the central regulating mechanism under capitalism. Competition within an industry forces individual producers to set prices with an eye on the market, just as it forces them continually to try to cut costs so that they can cut prices and expand market share. Cost-cutting can take place through wage reduction, increases in the length or intensity of the working day, and through technical change. The latter becomes the central means over the long run [my emphasis].

…The notion of competition as a form of warfare has important implications. Tactics, strategy, and resulting prospects for growth are central concerns of the competitive firm…In the battle of real competition, the mobility of capital is the movement from one terrain to another, the development and adoption of technology is the arms race, and the struggle for profit growth and market share is the battle itself.”

Anwar Shaikh (2016), Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises, p.259-260

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