Michael Hudson on Quantitative Easing

Plenty of economists, investors and others have been wondering what will happen to financial markets and the real economy as monetary stimulus in the form of Quantitative Easing is wound down by central banks from the US to the Eurozone in the face of stronger growth.

I will be writing more about it next week, considering the perspectives of critic Richard Koo among others, but here is Michael Hudson from, as ever, his iconoclastic and insightful ‘dictionary’ J is for Junk Economics (p.189-91): Continue reading

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Finance, inequality, ecology – an interview with Steve Keen

A nice interview with post-Keynesian Professor Steve Keen, in which he discusses what are (or should be) some of the most important issues in modern economics.

He covers the role of finance and private debt in generating inequality and what can be done to reduce it; the idea and feasibility of a universal basic income; economics and planetary ecology; and the incorporation of energy into economic models.

Top ten posts of 2017

It is always interesting to see what topics attract the most interest here. So from one to ten, here are the most viewed posts on this blog in 2017, from those published during the last twelve months:

  1. Modern Monetary Theory and inflation – Anwar Shaikh’s critique
  2. Michael Hudson on Modern Monetary Theory
  3. Karl Marx on utility
  4. Free-market policies rarely make poor countries rich (Ha-Joon Chang’s Thing 7)
  5. Minsky on stagflation and the limits to state intervention
  6. Anwar Shaikh’s Classical theory of wages and unemployment
  7. Stiglitz on inequality and growth
  8. Ha-Joon Chang on inequality and capabilities
  9. Investment-savings, global imbalances and crisis: the economics of Michael Pettis
  10. Moseley’s macro-monetary Marx – a review and partial critique

All of the above were posted in 2017. However, the four most viewed posts of the year were published in previous years and the top two far outstripped the others. Here are the links:

  1. Some macroeconomic paradoxes: part 1
  2. Marx’s labour theory of value and exploitation under capitalism
  3. Keynes on inequality
  4. Holistic theory and political economy

Thanks to all my readers for your interest last year. Wishing you a happy 2018.

Robert Reich on 3 economic myths

Robert Reich is an influential commentator, professor and author, who served under US Presidents Ford, Carter and Clinton, in the latter case as Labor Secretary. YouTube features plenty of his short, useful videos on economics and politics. Here is one of them. Thanks to Lars P. Syll for drawing my attention to it on his blog.

As an aside, I like Reich’s use of illustrative cartoons!

John Weeks on the Economics of the 1%

Below is a useful excerpt from the book launch of Professor John Weeks‘ Economics of the 1%. It came out in 2014, and I can wholeheartedly recommend it. The book is aimed at the intelligent general reader, and contains plenty of ‘debunking’ of myths in economics from a left perspective, as well as the author’s ideas for economic reform.

Weeks has written other more technical books for those who are interested, most recently Capital, Exploitation and Economic Crisis and The Irreconcilable Inconsistencies of Neoclassical Macroeconomics. The first is Weeks’ constructive take on Marx’s theory of capitalism and crisis, while the second is a thorough critique of neoclassical macroeconomics, as the title suggests.

J is for Junk Economics – Michael Hudson on the Real News Network

This year I have been regularly posting excerpts from Michael Hudson’s new book J is for Junk Economics. Below is Part One of his interview with The Real News Network, in which he discusses his reasons for writing this iconoclastic ‘dictionary’ of economic thought. In his words, it is a guide to how the economy really works and seeks to overturn a misleading orthodoxy propagated by the media and many academics, not least economists!

The US does not have the highest living standard in the world (Ha-Joon Chang’s Thing 10)

23-things-they-don-t-tell-you-about-capitalismAnother telling extract from Ha-Joon Chang’s 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (p.102-3, 111):

“The average US citizen does have greater command over goods and services than his counterpart in any other country in the world except Luxembourg. However, given the country’s high inequality, this average is less accurate in representing how people live than the averages for other countries with a more equal income distribution. Higher inequality is also behind the poorer health indicators and worse crime statistics of the US. Moreover, the same dollar buys more things in the US than in most other rich countries mainly because it has cheaper services than in other comparable countries, thanks to higher immigration and poorer employment conditions. Furthermore, Americans work considerably longer than Europeans. Per hour worked, their command over goods and services is smaller than that of several European countries. While we can debate which is a better lifestyle – more material goods with less leisure time (as in the US) or fewer material goods with more leisure time (as in Europe) – this suggests that the US does not have an unambiguously higher living standard than comparable countries.

…There is no simple way to compare living standards across countries…by focusing just on how many goods and services our income can buy, we miss out a lot of other things that constitute elements of the ‘good life’, such as the amount of quality leisure time, job security, freedom from crime, access to healthcare, social welfare provisions, and so on. While different individuals and countries will definitely have different views on how to weigh these indicators against each other and against income figures, non-income dimensions should not be ignored, if we are to build societies where people genuinely ‘live well’.”